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Praxis 5652 Standards Mapping

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Fundamentals of Cybersecurity

249 Standards in this Framework 79 Standards Mapped 31% Mapped to Course


Standard Lessons
I.A.1 Understand computing as a way of expressing creativity, solving problems, enabling communication, and fostering innovation in a variety of fields and careers
  1. 2.7 Hacking Ethics
  2. 8.4 Databases
  3. 8.5 Clients and Servers
  4. 8.9 Common Security Problems
I.A.1.a recognize that computers can be used to showcase creativity
  1. 3.1 Project: Public Service Announcement
I.A.1.b recognize the benefits of using computers to solve problems
  1. 7.4 Software and Applications
I.A.1.c provide examples of how computers enable communication and collaboration
  1. 7.4 Software and Applications
I.A.1.d provide examples of how computers foster innovation
  1. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.2 Know the obstacles to equal access to computing among different groups and the impact of those obstacles
  1. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.2.a identify obstacles to equal access to computing among different groups (e.g., groups defined by gender, socioeconomic status, disability/accessibility needs) and the impact of those obstacles
  1. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.2.b identify factors that contribute to the digital divide
  1. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.2.c match obstacles to equal access with effective solutions
  1. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.3 Understand beneficial and harmful effects of computing innovations and the trade-offs between them
  1. 2.4 Privacy & Security
  2. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.3.a analyze computing innovations in terms of their social, economic, and cultural impacts, both beneficial and harmful
  1. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.A.3.b identify trade-offs between beneficial and harmful effects of computer innovations
  1. 2.4 Privacy & Security
I.B.1 Know different methods of protecting intellectual property rights and the trade-offs between them in a variety of contexts (e.g., Creative Commons, open source, copyright)
  1. 2.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
I.B.1.a using correct vocabulary, describe how different methods of protecting intellectual property rights work
  1. 2.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
I.B.1.b given a context, identify appropriate methods of protecting intellectual property rights
  1. 2.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
I.B.1.c identify and compare trade-offs between different methods of protecting intellectual property rights
  1. 2.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
I.B.2 Understand ethical and unethical computing practices and their social, economic, and cultural implications
  1. 2.7 Hacking Ethics
  2. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.B.2.a identify ethical and unethical computing practices in context
  1. 2.7 Hacking Ethics
  2. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.B.2.b describe the social, economic, and cultural implications of ethical and unethical computing practices
  1. 2.7 Hacking Ethics
  2. 10.10 Impact of the Internet
I.B.2.c identify the conditions under which a given computing practice is ethical or legal
  1. 2.7 Hacking Ethics
I.B.3 Know privacy and security issues regarding the acquisition, use, and disclosure of information in a digital world
  1. 2.4 Privacy & Security
I.B.3.a using correct vocabulary, describe privacy and security issues
  1. 2.4 Privacy & Security
I.B.3.b using correct vocabulary, describe privacy and security issues
  1. 2.4 Privacy & Security
I.B.3.c describe trade-offs between local and cloud-based data storage
  1. 11.4 Storage Options
I.B.3.d identify methods that digital services use to collect information about users
  1. 8.3 The Value of Data
II.A.1 Understand abstraction as a foundation of computer science
II.A.1.a identify, create, or complete the correct ordering, from low to high, of an abstraction hierarchy
II.A.1.b identify abstractions in context
II.A.1.c identify details that can be removed from a solution in order to generalize it
II.A.2 Know how to use pattern recognition, problem decomposition, and abstraction to develop an algorithm
II.A.2.a given a table of values or other data source, identify the patterns in the data and identify algorithms that could produce the patterns
II.A.2.b identify components that could be part of an algorithm to solve a problem
II.A.2.c identify actions and actors when decomposing a problem
II.A.2.d identify appropriate decomposition strategies
II.A.3 Understand number base conversion and binary, decimal, and hexadecimal number systems
  1. 10.2 Notational Systems
II.A.3.a convert between number bases
  1. 10.2 Notational Systems
II.A.3.b analyze and compare representations of numbers in different bases
  1. 10.2 Notational Systems
II.A.4 Understand how to develop and analyze algorithms expressed in multiple formats (e.g., natural language, flowcharts, pseudocode)
  1. 4.6 Organizational Techniques
II.A.4.a interpret diagrams that describe algorithms, given an explanation of the symbols used
  1. 4.6 Organizational Techniques
II.A.4.b compare algorithms written in multiple formats
II.A.4.c trace and analyze algorithms written in different formats
II.A.4.d identify correct sequencing of steps in an algorithm and errors in sequencing
  1. 4.3 Looping
II.B.1 Be familiar with the limitations of computing in terms of time, space, and solvability as well as with the use of heuristic solutions that can address these limitations
II.B.1.a identify and compare algorithms that are linear, quadratic, exponential, or logarithmic
II.B.1.b recognize the existence of problems that cannot be solved by a computer
II.B.1.c in context, identify factors that prevent a problem from being solvable
II.B.1.d identify situations where heuristic solutions are useful
II.B.1.e in context, identify space and time limitations of computational solutions to problems
II.B.2 Understand searching and sorting algorithms; can analyze sorting algorithms for correctness and can analyze searching algorithms for correctness and efficiency
II.B.2.a trace algorithms and predict output and intermediate results
II.B.2.b calculate the number of comparisons required for linear and binary search algorithms
II.B.3 Understand simple recursive algorithms (e.g., n factorial, sum of first n integers)
II.B.3.a trace simple recursive algorithms
II.B.3.b provide missing steps in incomplete simple recursive algorithms
II.B.3.c identify parts of a recursive algorithm (e.g., base or stopping condition, recursive call)
II.B.3.d identify errors in simple recursive algorithms
II.B.3.e identify an iterative algorithm that is equivalent to a recursive algorithm
II.B.4 Be familiar with the use of randomization in computing
II.B.4.a identify appropriate uses of randomization in a variety of applications
II.B.4.b identify the difference between random and pseudorandom numbers
III.A.1 Understand how to write and modify computer programs in a text-based programming language
  1. 4.5 Arrays and Objects
III.A.1.a describe what a program does or be able to choose the code segment that correctly implements a given intended purpose
  1. 4.3 Looping
  2. 4.4 Branching
  3. 4.5 Arrays and Objects
III.A.1.b identify missing code in a code segment with a stated intended purpose
III.A.1.c place statements in appropriate order to create a correct program
III.A.1.d identify how changing one part of a code segment will affect the output
III.A.2 Understand how to analyze computer programs in terms of correctness
III.A.2.a trace code and indicate the output printed or the value of variables after code segment execution
III.A.2.b indicate the inputs that produce given outputs for a code segment
III.A.2.c describe what a program does or choose the code segment that correctly implements a given intended purpose
III.A.2.d identify valid preconditions and postconditions
III.A.2.e compare two code segments or algorithm
III.A.2.f identify the type of error produced by a code segment (i.e., syntax, runtime, compile-time, overflow, round-off, logic)
III.A.2.g identify errors in incorrect code and changes that can be made to correct them
III.A.3 Know the concepts of extensibility, modifiability, and reusability
III.A.3.a identify the meaning of the terms
III.A.3.b identify functionally equivalent statements or code segments that differ in one of these three ways
III.A.3.c identify situations where the use of constants or variables would be preferred over hard-coded values
III.A.3.d identify opportunities for parameterization
III.A.3.e choose code that improves on given code by making it more extensible, modifiable, or reusable
III.A.3.f identify changes that would improve a given code segment
III.A.4 Understand the three basic constructs used in programming: sequence, selection, and iteration
III.A.4.a trace code and indicate the output printed or the value of variables after code segment execution
III.A.4.b indicate inputs that produce given outputs for a code segment
III.A.4.c describe what a program does or choose the code segment that correctly implements a given intended purpose
III.A.4.d identify missing code in a code segment with a stated intended purpose
III.A.4.e identify equivalent statements or code segments
III.A.4.f identify the three constructs when used in code
III.A.4.g identify which of the constructs are needed to implement given functionality
  1. 22.11 Javascript Control Structures Quiz
III.A.4.h convert code that does not use iteration to equivalent code that uses iteration
III.A.5 Understand how to use standard operators (i.e., assignment, arithmetic, relational, logical) and operator precedence to write programs
III.A.5.a trace code and indicate the output displayed or the value of variables after code segment execution
III.A.5.b indicate inputs that produce given outputs for a code segment
III.A.5.c describe what a program does or choose the code segment that correctly implements a stated intended purpose
III.A.5.d identify missing code in a code segment with a stated intended purpose
III.A.5.e identify equivalent statements or code segments
III.A.5.f place statements in appropriate order to create a correct program
III.A.5.g use Boolean algebra to identify equivalent Boolean expressions
III.A.5.h write a Boolean expression equivalent to given code, or identify code equivalent to a given Boolean expression or English description
III.A.5.i identify the correct implementation of a given formula, including formulas with fractions
III.A.5.j evaluate expressions that include arithmetic operations
III.A.6 Understand how to use variables and a variety of data types
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
III.A.6.a identify variables and data types (e.g., integers, floating point, string, Booleans, arrays/lists)
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
  2. 4.5 Arrays and Objects
III.A.6.b identify the need for type conversion
III.A.6.c trace code and indicate the output printed or the value of variables after code segment execution
III.A.6.d indicate the inputs that produce given outputs for a code segment
III.A.6.e describe what a program does or choose the code segment that correctly implements a stated intended purpose
III.A.6.f identify missing code in a code segment with a stated intended purpose
III.A.6.g identify equivalent statements or code segment
III.A.6.h place statements in appropriate order to create a correct program
III.A.6.i describe the difference between integer and floating point numeric data types
III.A.6.j describe the difference between integer and floating point division
III.A.6.k describe the benefits of the use of each data type
III.A.6.l distinguish between global and local scope
III.A.6.m identify the most appropriate data type in a given context
III.A.6.n identify the correct sequence of string operations to produce a given output
III.B.1 Understand how to write and call procedures with parameters and return values
III.B.1.a trace code and indicate the output printed or the value of variables after code segment execution
III.B.1.b indicate inputs that produce given outputs for a code segment
III.B.1.c describe what a program does or choose the code segment that correctly implements a stated intended purpose
III.B.1.d identify missing code in a code segment with a stated intended purpose
III.B.1.e identify equivalent statements or code segments
III.B.1.f place statements in appropriate order to create a correct program
III.B.1.g trace code when references to objects and arrays are passed to procedures
III.B.1.h trace code that includes nested procedure calls
III.B.10 Be familiar with the features and capabilities of integrated development environments (IDEs)
III.B.10.a identify components of IDEs
III.B.10.b identify benefits and drawbacks of using IDEs
III.B.10.c identify the costs and benefits of context editors
III.B.11 Be familiar with the differences between low- and high-level programming languages
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
III.B.11.a identify characteristics of low- and high-level languages
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
III.B.12 Be familiar with different programming paradigms
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
III.B.12.a identify the terminology of procedural programming
III.B.12.b identify the terminology of object-oriented programming
III.B.12.c compare programming paradigms
III.B.13 Know object-oriented programming concepts
III.B.13.a identify classes, instance variables, and methods given a diagram
III.B.13.b identify the benefits of inheritance and encapsulation
III.B.13.c identify distinctions between overloading and overriding
III.B.14 Be familiar with program compilation and program interpretation
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
III.B.14.a identify differences between compilation and interpretation
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
III.B.14.b identify differences between source code and object code
III.B.2 Know the concepts of event-driven programs that respond to external events (e.g., sensors, messages, clicks)
III.B.2.a trace code and indicate the output printed or the value of variables after code segment execution
III.B.2.b indicate inputs that produce given outputs for a code segment
III.B.2.c describe what a program does or choose the code segment that correctly implements a stated intended purpose
III.B.2.d identify missing code in a code segment with a stated intended purpose
III.B.2.e identify possible errors due to asynchronous events
III.B.2.f identify aspects of concurrency in event-driven programming
III.B.3 Be familiar with usability and user experience (e.g., ease of use and accessibility)
III.B.3.a identify code that improves on given code in terms of usability or user experience
III.B.3.b identify meaningful error messages
III.B.3.c identify features that improve accessibility
III.B.4 Be familiar with dictionaries/maps, stacks, and queues
III.B.4.a identify a data structure based on a description of behavior or appropriate use
III.B.4.b given goals, constraints, or context, identify the most appropriate data structure
III.B.4.c trace code that uses a particular data structure
III.B.5 Understand how to use debugging techniques and appropriate test cases
III.B.5.a identify which test cases are most useful for given code
III.B.5.b differentiate between different types of errors (e.g., overflow, round-off, syntax, runtime, compile-time, logic)
III.B.5.c describe useful debugging techniques (e.g., where to put print statements)
III.B.5.d differentiate between empirical testing and proof
III.B.5.e identify errors in code and solutions to those errors
III.B.6 Be familiar with characteristics of well-documented computer programs that are usable, readable, and modular
III.B.6.a identify characteristics of good documentation
III.B.6.b identify good and poor documentation practices in context
III.B.7 Be familiar with techniques to obtain and use feedback to produce high-quality code (e.g., code reviews, peer feedback, end user feedback)
III.B.7.a identify situations in which each of the three listed techniques are useful
III.B.8 Know how to use libraries and APIs
III.B.8.a identify correct call(s) and use of return values given an A P I definition
III.B.8.b identify reasons to use or not use libraries in place of writing original code
III.B.8.c identify applications (e.g., math libraries, random number generation) that use APIs
III.B.9 Understand programming techniques to validate correct input and detect incorrect input
III.B.9.a identify effective input data validation strategies
III.B.9.b compare data validation (proper range and format) and data verification (e.g., password verification)
III.B.9.c identify improvements to code for which data validation is required
IV.A.1 Understand bits as the universal medium for expressing digital information
  1. 10.2 Notational Systems
IV.A.1.a perform calculations, using bits and bytes
IV.A.1.b determine the number of bits and bytes required to store a given amount of data
  1. 11.4 Storage Options
IV.A.1.c given the description of an encoding scheme, encode or decode data
IV.A.1.d describe lossy and lossless data compression
IV.A.1.e explain why binary numbers are fundamental to the operation of computer systems
  1. 10.2 Notational Systems
IV.A.2 Be familiar with concepts of data encryption and decryption
  1. 5.1 Cryptography, Cryptology, Cryptanalysis
IV.A.2.a distinguish between encoding and encryption
IV.A.2.b identify trade-offs in the use of data encryption
  1. 5.1 Cryptography, Cryptology, Cryptanalysis
IV.A.3 Know how to use computational tools, including spreadsheets, to analyze data in order to discover, explain, and visualize patterns, connections, and trends
IV.A.3.a transform data to make it more useful
IV.A.3.b identify specific data or characteristics of specific data that need to be removed or modified before an entire data set can be used
IV.A.3.c describe the use of spreadsheet operations (e.g., formulas, filters, sorts, charts, graphs) to analyze and visualize data
IV.B.1 Be familiar with the use of computing in simulation and modeling
IV.B.1.a describe questions that can be answered with a given simulation, or explain what data and process are required in a simulation in order to answer a given question
IV.B.1.b trace code in a simulation context
IV.B.1.c identify missing code in a simulation context
IV.B.1.d identify the impact of changes to simulations (e.g., more or fewer variables, more or less data)
IV.B.1.e identify applications of simulation and modeling
IV.B.2 Be familiar with methods to store, manage, and manipulate data
  1. 8.4 Databases
IV.B.2.a use terminology and concepts of files and databases
  1. 8.4 Databases
IV.B.2.b identify measures of file size (e.g., byte, kilo, mega, giga, tera, peta)
  1. 11.4 Storage Options
IV.B.2.c identify issues connected with the storage requirements of computing applications, including scale, redundancy, and backup
  1. 11.4 Storage Options
IV.B.3 Be familiar with a variety of computational methods for data collection, aggregation, and generation
IV.B.3.a identify the benefits of working with publicly available data sets
IV.B.3.b identify the types of data generated by surveys and sensors
IV.B.3.c identify examples of crowdsourcing and citizen science
IV.B.3.d identify appropriate data-collection methods for a given context and purpose
V.A.1 Know that operating systems are programs that control and coordinate interactions between hardware and software components
  1. 7.1 Operating Systems
V.A.1.a identify hardware components and their functions
  1. 10.4 Internet Hardware and Sending Information
  2. 11.1 Internal Components
  3. 11.2 Peripheral Devices
  4. 11.3 Network Devices
V.A.1.b identify software components and their functions
  1. 7.4 Software and Applications
V.A.1.c identify common operating systems tasks
  1. 7.1 Operating Systems
  2. 7.2 Comparing Operating Systems
V.A.1.d identify resource issues that have an impact on functionality
V.A.2 Be familiar with computing systems embedded in everyday objects (e.g., Internet of Things [IoT], ATMs, medical devices)
  1. 7.1 Operating Systems
V.A.2.a describe what an embedded system is
  1. 7.1 Operating Systems
V.A.2.b define what the IoT is and how it is used
  1. 1.2 What is Cybersecurity?
  2. 1.3 Impact of Cybersecurity
V.A.2.c describe how sensors are used in embedded systems
V.A.3 Know the capabilities, features, and uses of different types of computing systems (e.g., desktop, mobile, cluster)
V.A.3.a identify capabilities, features, and uses for each type of computer system
V.A.3.b identify criteria to evaluate and compare computing systems
V.A.4 Be familiar with computers as layers of abstraction from hardware (e.g., logic gates, chips) to software (e.g., system software, applications)
V.A.4.a identify appropriate abstraction layers for hardware and software components
V.A.5 Be familiar with the steps required to execute a computer program (fetch-decode-execute cycles)
V.A.5.a describe what happens during fetch, decode, and execute, including the order of the steps in the cycle
V.A.6 Be familiar with trade-offs between local, network, and cloud computing and storage
  1. 11.5 Network Options
V.A.6.a identify advantages and disadvantages in terms of performance, cost, security, reliability, and collaboration
V.A.6.b identify means of storing binary data
V.A.7 Be familiar with communication between devices
  1. 11.6 Network Communication
V.A.7.a identify and compare wireless communication systems
  1. 11.6 Network Communication
V.A.7.b identify and compare wired communication systems
  1. 11.5 Network Options
  2. 11.6 Network Communication
V.A.7.c identify and compare network types
  1. 11.5 Network Options
  2. 11.6 Network Communication
V.B.1 Know components of networks
  1. 11.5 Network Options
  2. 11.6 Network Communication
V.B.1.a identify network hardware devices and their functions
  1. 11.3 Network Devices
V.B.1.b describe possible abstraction models of networks
V.B.2 Be familiar with factors that have an impact on network functionality
  1. 11.6 Network Communication
V.B.2.a define basic terminology (e.g., bandwidth, load, latency)
  1. 11.5 Network Options
  2. 11.6 Network Communication
V.B.2.b estimate necessary bandwidth and data size for a given situation
V.B.2.c identify critical resources for a given situation
V.B.3 Be familiar with how Internet and Web protocols work
  1. 10.7 Routing
  2. 10.8 Packets & Protocols
V.B.3.a describe the purpose of protocols and identify common Internet and Web protocols
  1. 10.7 Routing
  2. 10.8 Packets & Protocols
V.B.3.b compare IPv4 and IPv6
  1. 10.5 Internet Addresses
V.B.3.c identify and describe the basic parts of a U R L (e.g., protocol, subdomain, domain name, port, path)
  1. 10.5 Internet Addresses
V.B.3.d describe the hierarchical structure of names in the domain name system (DNS)
  1. 10.6 Domain Name System (DNS)
V.B.3.e describe the purpose and function of I P addressing
  1. 10.5 Internet Addresses
V.B.3.f identify how Internet protocols address reliability, redundancy, and error handling
  1. 10.8 Packets & Protocols
V.B.4 Be familiar with digital and physical strategies for maintaining security
V.B.4.a identify characteristics of strong passwords (e.g., length, bits per character)
  1. 2.4 Privacy & Security
V.B.4.b identify digital and physical security strategies
V.B.4.c identify trade-offs in the use of security measures (e.g., encryption, decryption, digital signatures and certificates)
V.B.5 Be familiar with concepts of cybersecurity
  1. 1.2 What is Cybersecurity?
  2. 1.3 Impact of Cybersecurity
V.B.5.a identify and define the five pillars of cybersecurity: confidentiality, integrity, availability, nonrepudiation, and authentication
  1. 1.4 The CIA Triad
V.B.6 Be familiar with the components that make up the Web (e.g., HTTP, HTML, browsers, servers, clients)
  1. 7.7 Browser Configuration
  2. 10.1 Introduction to the Internet
V.B.6.a identify the uses of markup languages
  1. 4.1 Programming Concepts
V.B.6.b identify the purposes of browsers, servers, and clients
  1. 7.7 Browser Configuration