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Arkansas 9-12 Standards Mapping

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AP Computer Science Principles

122 Standards in this Framework 82 Standards Mapped 67% Mapped to Course


Standard Lessons
CSL1.1.1 Leverage problem-solving strategies to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some problem-solving strategies may include but are not limited to recursion, iteration, Agile method, 6-step engineering design process, and waterfall.
  1. 2.11 For Loops
  2. 2.12 If Statements
  3. 2.13 If/Else Statements
  4. 2.14 While Loops in Karel
  5. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  6. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
  7. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL2.1.1 Leverage problem-solving strategies to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some problem-solving strategies may include but are not limited to recursion, iteration, Agile method, 6-step engineering design process, and waterfall.
  1. 2.11 For Loops
  2. 2.12 If Statements
  3. 2.13 If/Else Statements
  4. 2.14 While Loops in Karel
  5. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  6. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
  7. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL3.1.1 Leverage problem-solving strategies to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some problem-solving strategies may include but are not limited to recursion, iteration, Agile method, 6-step engineering design process, and waterfall.
  1. 2.11 For Loops
  2. 2.12 If Statements
  3. 2.13 If/Else Statements
  4. 2.14 While Loops in Karel
  5. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  6. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL4.1.1 Leverage problem-solving strategies to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some problem-solving strategies may include but are not limited to recursion, iteration, Agile method, 6-step engineering design process, and waterfall.
  1. 2.11 For Loops
  2. 2.12 If Statements
  3. 2.13 If/Else Statements
  4. 2.14 While Loops in Karel
  5. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  6. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL1.1.2 Compare and contrast multiple representations of problem-solving logic. NOTE: Some representation methods may include but are not limited to documentation, backlog, sprints, decision matrix, design brief, flowchart, and pseudocode.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  3. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
CSL2.1.2 Analyze multiple representations of problem-solving logic. NOTE: Some representation methods may include but are not limited to documentation, backlog, sprints, decision matrix, design brief, flowchart, and pseudocode.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  3. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
CSL3.1.2 Design multiple representations of problem-solving logic used to solve a problem of appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some representation methods may include but are not limited to documentation, backlog, sprints, decision matrix, design brief, flowchart, and pseudocode.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
CSL4.1.2 Critique multiple representations of problem-solving logic used to solve a problem of appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some representation methods may include but are not limited to documentation, backlog, sprints, decision matrix, design brief, flowchart, and pseudocode.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
CSL1.1.3 Analyze and implement collaborative methods in problem solving of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some implementation methods may include but are not limited to paired programming, distributive (divide & conquer), and redundant parallel.
CSL2.1.3 Analyze and implement collaborative methods in problem solving of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some implementation methods may include but are not limited to paired programming, distributive (divide & conquer), and redundant parallel.
CSL3.1.3 Analyze and implement collaborative methods in problem solving of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some implementation methods may include but are not limited to paired programming, distributive (divide & conquer), and redundant parallel.
CSL4.1.3 Analyze and implement collaborative methods in problem solving of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some implementation methods may include but are not limited to paired programming, distributive (divide & conquer), and redundant parallel.
CSL1.1.4 Recognize processes and techniques for troubleshooting of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some processes and techniques for troubleshooting may include but are not limited to tracing; debugging; identification/removal of malware; and error-classification including syntax, logic, runtime, and off-by-one errors.
  1. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
CSL2.1.4 Recognize processes and techniques for troubleshooting of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some processes and techniques for troubleshooting may include but are not limited to tracing; debugging; identification/removal of malware; and error-classification including syntax, logic, runtime, and off-by-one errors.
  1. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
CSL3.1.4 Recognize processes and techniques for troubleshooting of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some processes and techniques for troubleshooting may include but are not limited to tracing; debugging; identification/removal of malware; and error-classification including syntax, logic, runtime, and off-by-one errors.
CSL4.1.4 Recognize processes and techniques for troubleshooting of level-appropriate complexity. NOTE: Some processes and techniques for troubleshooting may include but are not limited to tracing; debugging; identification/removal of malware; and error-classification including syntax, logic, runtime, and off-by-one errors.
CSL1.1.5 Decompose a problem of level-appropriate complexity into more simple, solvable parts. NOTE: Solvable parts may include but are not limited to methods, functions, and subroutines with and without parameters.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.11 For Loops
  3. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  4. 2.17 Karel Algorithms
  5. 2.20 Karel Challenges
  6. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  7. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  8. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  9. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  10. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
CSL2.1.5 Decompose a problem of level-appropriate complexity into more simple, solvable parts. NOTE: Solvable parts may include but are not limited to methods, functions, and subroutines with and without parameters.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.11 For Loops
  3. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  4. 2.17 Karel Algorithms
  5. 2.20 Karel Challenges
  6. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  7. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  8. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  9. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  10. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
CSL3.1.5 Decompose a problem of level-appropriate complexity into more simple, solvable parts. NOTE: Solvable parts may include but are not limited to methods, functions, and subroutines with and without parameters.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.11 For Loops
  3. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  4. 2.17 Karel Algorithms
  5. 2.20 Karel Challenges
  6. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  7. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  8. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  9. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  10. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
CSL4.1.5 Decompose a problem of level-appropriate complexity into more simple, solvable parts. NOTE: Solvable parts may include but are not limited to methods, functions, and subroutines with and without parameters.
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.11 For Loops
  3. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  4. 2.17 Karel Algorithms
  5. 2.20 Karel Challenges
  6. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  7. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  8. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  9. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  10. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
CSL1.2.1 Interpret logical expressions using Boolean operators (e.g., AND, NOT, OR, XOR)
  1. 5.1 Booleans
  2. 5.2 Logical Operators
  3. 5.3 Comparison Operators
CSL2.2.1 Interpret logical expressions using short-circuit evaluation
  1. 5.3 Comparison Operators
CSL1.2.2 Classify the types of information that can be stored as variables (e.g., Booleans, characters, integers, floating points, strings)
  1. 4.4 Variables
CSL1.2.3 Identify mathematical concepts (e.g., random number generation, vocabulary) related to computer science
  1. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
  2. 5.8 Random Numbers
CSL2.2.3 Recognize the similarities and differences between mathematics and computer science algorithms
  1. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
CSL3.2.3 Demonstrate basic encryption (e.g., block cipher, Caesar cipher)
  1. 9.10 Cryptography
CSL2.2.4 Discuss the concept of abstraction
  1. 2.9 Abstraction
  2. 9.2 Number Systems
  3. 9.3 Encoding Text with Binary
CSL3.2.4 Analyze the concepts of abstraction as modeling and abstraction as encapsulation
  1. 2.9 Abstraction
CSL4.2.4 Use the concepts of abstraction as modeling and abstraction as encapsulation
  1. 2.9 Abstraction
CSL2.2.5 Perform simple operations with base10, base2, and base16 numbers. NOTE: Some operations may include but are not limited to addition, subtraction, and conversion.
  1. 9.2 Number Systems
  2. 9.3 Encoding Text with Binary
CSL4.2.5 Perform simple operations with base10, base2, base8, and base16 numbers. NOTE: Some operations may include but are not limited to addition, subtraction, and conversion.
  1. 9.2 Number Systems
  2. 9.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  3. 9.5 Hexadecimal
CSL1.2.6 Demonstrate operator (e.g., +, -, /, %, concatenation) precedence in expressions and statements. NOTE: Some examples of operator precedence and assignment may include but are not limited to inside-out, order of operations, and x = 1 is not the same as 1 = x.
CSL2.2.6 Demonstrate operator (e.g., math, pow, sqrt) precedence in expressions and statements. NOTE: Some examples of operator precedence and assignment may include but are not limited to inside-out, order of operations, and x = 1 is not the same as 1 = x.
  1. 4.4 Variables
  2. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
CSL1.3.1 Define, store, and manipulate primitive data. NOTE: Primitive data can include, but is not limited to, bool, char, double, float, int. Defining and storing can include, but are not limited to, modifiers such as final, private, protected, public. Manipulating data can include, but is not limited to, arranging (including stacking and queuing), casting, rearranging, sorting.
  1. 8.8 Simulation
  2. 14.2 Visualizing and Interpreting Data
CSL2.3.1 Define, store, and manipulate linear data. NOTE: Linear data can include, but is not limited to, arrays, lists, strings, vectors. Defining and storing can include, but are not limited to, modifiers such as final, private, protected, public. Manipulating data can include, but is not limited to, arranging (including stacking and queuing), casting, rearranging, sorting.
  1. 8.1 Intro to Lists/Arrays
  2. 8.2 Indexing Into an Array
  3. 8.3 Adding/Removing From an Array
  4. 8.4 Array Length and Looping Through Arrays
  5. 8.5 Iterating Over an Array
  6. 8.6 Finding an Element in a List
  7. 8.7 Removing an Element From an Array
CSL3.3.1 Define, store, and manipulate structured data and objects. NOTE: Structured data can include, but is not limited to, arrays, classes, linked lists, multidimensional arrays, structs, user-defined classes. Objects can include, but are not limited to, constructors, data members, methods, pass-by-value/pass-by-reference parameters. Defining and storing can include, but are not limited to, modifiers such as final, private, protected, public. Manipulating data can include, but is not limited to, arranging (including stacking and queuing), casting, rearranging, sorting.
  1. 8.1 Intro to Lists/Arrays
  2. 8.2 Indexing Into an Array
  3. 8.3 Adding/Removing From an Array
  4. 8.4 Array Length and Looping Through Arrays
  5. 8.5 Iterating Over an Array
  6. 8.6 Finding an Element in a List
  7. 8.7 Removing an Element From an Array
CSL4.3.1 Create a program to store and manipulate various data. NOTE: Structured data can include, but is not limited to, arrays, classes, linked lists, multidimensional arrays, structs, user-defined classes. Objects can include, but are not limited to, constructors, data members, methods, pass-by-value/pass-by-reference parameters. Defining and storing can include, but are not limited to, modifiers such as final, private, protected, public. Manipulating data can include, but is not limited to, arranging (including stacking and queuing), casting, rearranging, sorting.
CSL1.3.2 Compare and contrast level-appropriate numeric and non-numeric data representations. NOTE: Topics could include, but are not limited to, analog vs. digital, ASCII/Unicode, bar codes, compression, encoding, light/pixels, size of file vs. data types vs. storage needed, sound wave/sampling.
  1. 9.2 Number Systems
  2. 9.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  3. 9.5 Hexadecimal
CSL2.3.2 Compare and contrast level-appropriate numeric and non-numeric data representations. NOTE: Topics could include, but are not limited to, analog vs. digital, ASCII/Unicode, bar codes, compression, encoding, light/pixels, size of file vs. data types vs. storage needed, sound wave/sampling.
  1. 9.2 Number Systems
  2. 9.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  3. 9.5 Hexadecimal
CSL3.3.2 Compare and contrast level-appropriate numeric and non-numeric data representations. NOTE: Topics could include, but are not limited to, analog vs. digital, ASCII/Unicode, bar codes, compression, encoding, light/pixels, size of file vs. data types vs. storage needed, sound wave/sampling.
  1. 9.4 Pixel Images
  2. 9.5 Hexadecimal
  3. 9.6 Pixel Colors!
  4. 9.7 Image Manipulation
CSL4.3.2 Compare and contrast level-appropriate numeric and non-numeric data representations. NOTE: Topics could include, but are not limited to, analog vs. digital, ASCII/Unicode, bar codes, compression, encoding, light/pixels, size of file vs. data types vs. storage needed, sound wave/sampling.
  1. 9.4 Pixel Images
  2. 9.5 Hexadecimal
  3. 9.6 Pixel Colors!
  4. 9.7 Image Manipulation
CSL2.4.1 Analyze the degree to which a computer model accurately represents an actual situation (e.g., Conway’s Game of Life, population growth, predator-prey)
  1. 8.8 Simulation
CSL3.4.1 Critique techniques for creating models, simulations, and generating random numbers to be used for data analysis
  1. 8.8 Simulation
CSL4.4.1 Create various models and simulations as predictors for probabilistic scenarios (e.g., flip a coin, random walker, roll a die) and/or real-world scenarios (e.g., city population, predator-prey)
  1. 8.8 Simulation
CSL1.4.2 Examine the ability of computing technology to create and process Big Data
  1. 14.2 Visualizing and Interpreting Data
CSL2.4.2 Determine an appropriate visual representation for given data
  1. 14.2 Visualizing and Interpreting Data
CSL3.4.2 Compare and contrast multiple visual representation tools for given data
  1. 14.2 Visualizing and Interpreting Data
CSL2.4.3 Implement algorithms to perform data analysis (e.g., longest string, maximum, mean, minimum, range)
  1. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
CSL1.5.1 Construct and evaluate simple expressions using relational and logical operators
  1. 5.2 Logical Operators
  2. 5.3 Comparison Operators
CSL2.5.1 Construct and evaluate compound expressions using relational and logical operators
  1. 5.2 Logical Operators
  2. 5.3 Comparison Operators
CSL1.5.2 Design and implement algorithms that use sequence and selection including nested ifs (e.g., if, if/else, if/else if, switch-case)
  1. 2.12 If Statements
  2. 2.13 If/Else Statements
  3. 5.4 If Statements
CSL2.5.2 Design and implement algorithms that use sequence, selection, and iteration including nested loops (e.g., for, for each, while, do while)
  1. 2.11 For Loops
  2. 2.14 While Loops in Karel
  3. 5.5 For Loops in JavaScript
  4. 5.6 General For Loops
  5. 5.7 For Loop Practice
  6. 5.9 While Loops
  7. 5.10 Loop and a Half
CSL3.5.2 Design and implement algorithms that use sequence, selection, iteration and recursion
  1. 2.12 If Statements
  2. 2.13 If/Else Statements
  3. 5.4 If Statements
CSL1.5.3 Illustrate the flow of execution of a program including branching and looping
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
CSL2.5.3 Illustrate the flow of execution of an increasingly complex program including branching and looping
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
CSL3.5.3 Critically analyze classic search and sort algorithms in different contexts, adapting as appropriate
CSL1.5.4 Evaluate the qualities of level-appropriate algorithms. NOTE: Evaluation tools can include, but are not limited to, a code review and test cases. Qualities can include correctness, usability, readability, efficiency, portability, and scalability.
  1. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  2. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  3. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
  4. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL2.5.4 Evaluate the qualities of level-appropriate algorithms. NOTE: Evaluation tools can include, but are not limited to, a code review and test cases. Qualities can include correctness, usability, readability, efficiency, portability, and scalability.
  1. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  2. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  3. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
  4. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL3.5.4 Evaluate the qualities of level-appropriate algorithms. NOTE: Evaluation tools can include, but are not limited to, a code review and test cases. Qualities can include correctness, usability, readability, efficiency, portability, and scalability.
  1. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  2. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  3. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL4.5.4 Evaluate the qualities of level-appropriate algorithms. NOTE: Evaluation tools can include, but are not limited to, a code review and test cases. Qualities can include correctness, usability, readability, efficiency, portability, and scalability.
  1. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  2. 2.15 Control Structures Example
  3. 2.20 Karel Challenges
CSL1.5.5 Utilize a systematic approach to detect structural and logic errors
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  3. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
CSL2.5.5 Utilize a systematic approach to detect structural and logic errors
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
  3. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
CSL3.5.5 Utilize a systematic approach to detect structural and logic errors
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
CSL4.5.5 Utilize a systematic approach to detect structural and logic errors
  1. 2.7 Top Down Design and Decomposition in Karel
  2. 2.8 Commenting Your Code
CSL1.6.1 Create programs to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity applying best practices of program design and format (e.g., descriptive names, documentation, indentation, whitespace). NOTE: Problems of varying complexity can include, but are not limited to, encoding, encryption, finding minimum/maximum values, identifying prime numbers, searching and sorting, and solving the Towers of Hanoi.
  1. 4.4 Variables
  2. 4.5 User Input
  3. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
  4. 4.7 Using Graphics in JavaScript
CSL2.6.1 Create programs to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity applying best practices of program design and format (e.g., descriptive names, documentation, indentation, whitespace). NOTE: Problems of varying complexity can include, but are not limited to, encoding, encryption, finding minimum/maximum values, identifying prime numbers, searching and sorting, and solving the Towers of Hanoi.
  1. 4.4 Variables
  2. 4.5 User Input
  3. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
  4. 4.7 Using Graphics in JavaScript
CSL3.6.1 Create programs to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity applying best practices of program design and format (e.g., descriptive names, documentation, indentation, whitespace). NOTE: Problems of varying complexity can include, but are not limited to, encoding, encryption, finding minimum/maximum values, identifying prime numbers, searching and sorting, and solving the Towers of Hanoi.
  1. 4.4 Variables
  2. 4.5 User Input
  3. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
  4. 4.7 Using Graphics in JavaScript
CSL4.6.1 Create programs to solve problems of level-appropriate complexity applying best practices of program design and format (e.g., descriptive names, documentation, indentation, whitespace). NOTE: Problems of varying complexity can include, but are not limited to, encoding, encryption, finding minimum/maximum values, identifying prime numbers, searching and sorting, and solving the Towers of Hanoi.
  1. 4.4 Variables
  2. 4.5 User Input
  3. 4.6 Basic Math in JavaScript
  4. 4.7 Using Graphics in JavaScript
CSL1.6.2 Utilize functions/methods/procedures to input, output, and manipulate data with and without parameters. NOTE: In conjunction with standards CSL1.3.1 through CSL4.3.1, the goal is to introduce and implement object-oriented programming.
  1. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  2. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  3. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  4. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  5. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
  6. 6.6 Local Variables and Scope
CSL2.6.2 Determine the scope of variables declared in functions/methods/procedures and control structures. NOTE: In conjunction with standards CSL1.3.1 through CSL4.3.1, the goal is to introduce and implement object-oriented programming.
  1. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  2. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  3. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  4. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  5. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
  6. 6.6 Local Variables and Scope
CSL3.6.2 Determine the scope of variables and functions/methods/procedures declared in objects (e.g., public, private, encapsulation). NOTE: In conjunction with standards CSL1.3.1 through CSL4.3.1, the goal is to introduce and implement object-oriented programming.
  1. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  2. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  3. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  4. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  5. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
  6. 6.6 Local Variables and Scope
CSL4.6.2 Determine the scope of variables and functions/methods/procedures defined in abstract classes and interfaces (e.g., encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism). NOTE: In conjunction with standards CSL1.3.1 through CSL4.3.1, the goal is to introduce and implement object-oriented programming.
  1. 6.1 Functions and Parameters 1
  2. 6.2 Functions and Parameters 2
  3. 6.3 Functions and Parameters 3
  4. 6.4 Functions and Return Values 1
  5. 6.5 Functions and Return Values 2
  6. 6.6 Local Variables and Scope
CSL1.6.3 Create a program that reads from standard input and writes to standard output
  1. 4.5 User Input
CSL2.6.3 Create a program that reads from a file and writes to a file
CSL4.6.4 Explain advantages and disadvantages of various software life cycle processes (e.g., Agile, spiral, waterfall) by participating on software project teams
CSL2.7.1 Characterize how software and/or hardware is used in industry (e.g., business, government, medical, military, sports)
  1. 12.9 The Impact of the Internet
  2. 13.1 Practice PT: The Effects of the Internet
CSL4.7.1 Utilize software and/or hardware to solve various industry-based problems
CSL1.7.2 Identify desired technical and soft skills (e.g., collaboration, communication, problem solving, teamwork) that can be enhanced by computer science
CSL2.7.2 Discuss technical and soft skills honed by computer science
CSL3.7.2 Demonstrate technical and soft skills honed by computer science
CSL4.7.2 Demonstrate technical and soft skills honed by computer science
CSL1.7.3 Discuss diverse careers that are influenced by computer science and its availability to all regardless of background
CSL2.7.3 Analyze a historical timeline of computers and technology
CSL3.7.3 Explore advancing and emerging technologies (e.g., Artificially Intelligent Agents, Robotics, Internet of Things [IoT])
CSL4.7.3 Explain how cutting-edge technology may affect the way business is conducted in the future (e.g., eCommerce, entrepreneurship, payment methods, business responsibilities)
CSL1.8.1 Utilize networks to perform level-appropriate tasks
  1. 12.2 Internet Hardware
  2. 12.3 Internet Addresses
  3. 12.4 DNS
  4. 12.5 Routing
  5. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL2.8.1 Utilize networks to perform level-appropriate tasks
  1. 12.2 Internet Hardware
  2. 12.3 Internet Addresses
  3. 12.4 DNS
  4. 12.5 Routing
  5. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL3.8.1 Utilize networks to perform level-appropriate tasks
  1. 12.2 Internet Hardware
  2. 12.3 Internet Addresses
  3. 12.4 DNS
  4. 12.5 Routing
  5. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL4.8.1 Utilize networks to perform level-appropriate tasks
  1. 12.2 Internet Hardware
  2. 12.3 Internet Addresses
  3. 12.4 DNS
  4. 12.5 Routing
  5. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL1.8.2 Discuss the role of internet service providers (ISP) in providing connectivity
  1. 12.3 Internet Addresses
CSL2.8.2 Discuss the hierarchical nature of networks, subnetworks, and the Internet
  1. 12.3 Internet Addresses
  2. 12.4 DNS
  3. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL3.8.2 Analyze how the nature of networks allow for a continual increase in the number of devices
  1. 12.3 Internet Addresses
  2. 12.4 DNS
  3. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL4.8.2 Research projects that utilize the power created through the networking of computers to solve level-appropriate problems
CSL1.8.3 Compare and contrast local area networks (LAN) and wide area networks (WAN)
CSL2.8.3 Identify various common topologies utilized in network implementations
  1. 12.4 DNS
  2. 12.5 Routing
  3. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL3.8.3 Analyze the tradeoffs of implementing various common topologies
  1. 12.4 DNS
  2. 12.5 Routing
  3. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL4.8.3 Analyze the tradeoffs of implementing increasingly complex topologies
  1. 12.4 DNS
  2. 12.5 Routing
  3. 12.6 Packets and Protocols
CSL2.8.4 Identify digital and physical methods used to secure networks
CSL3.8.4 Discuss digital and physical methods used to secure networks
CSL4.8.4 Design a practical, efficient, and secure network solution (e.g., small office network)
CSL1.8.5 Identify common network protocols (e.g., DNS, HTTP/HTTPS, SMTP/POP/IMAP, Telnet/SSH)
  1. 12.4 DNS
CSL2.8.5 Compare and contrast common network protocols (e.g., DNS, HTTP/HTTPS, SMTP/POP/IMAP, Telnet/SSH)
  1. 12.4 DNS
CSL3.8.5 Analyze the Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) Model layers 1-7
CSL4.8.5 Map network operations to the OSI Model
CSL1.9.1 Compare and contrast computer programming paradigms and languages (e.g., text-based, visual, high-level, low-level, object-oriented)
  1. 4.1 What is Code
CSL2.9.1 Compare and contrast the tradeoffs between compiled and interpreted languages
  1. 4.1 What is Code
CSL3.9.1 Discuss considerations when programming for multiple computing platforms (e.g., desktop, mobile, web)
CSL1.9.2 Discuss version control and Integrated Development Environments (IDE)
  1. 4.3 Hello World
CSL2.9.2 Use the debugger in an IDE
  1. 2.16 Debugging Strategies
  2. 4.3 Hello World
CSL3.9.2 Use collaboration tools in a group software project (e.g., cloud-based software)
CSL4.9.2 Use version control systems
CSL1.9.3 Classify layers of software (e.g., applications, drivers, operating systems) within various platforms
CSL1.9.4 Identify hardware components (e.g., input/output devices, internal organization of a computer, storage devices) of computing technology within various platforms
  1. 12.2 Internet Hardware
CSL1.10.1 Categorize the risks associated with the utilization and implementation of digital technology. Legal Physical Psychological Social NOTE: Legal issues include but are not limited to access, AFTRA, copyright, FAA, FCC, hacking, intellectual property, licensure, local computer-use policy, piracy, and plagiarism.
CSL2.10.1 Discuss the effects associated with the use of social media (e.g., global communication, hiring, incarceration, termination)
CSL3.10.1 Explain conflicting issues related to creating and enforcing cyber-related laws and regulations (e.g., ethical challenges, policy vacuum, privacy vs. security, unintended consequences)
CSL4.10.1 Formulate solutions that address the risks associated with extensive use and implementation of digital technology
CSL1.10.2 Discuss issues related to personal security
CSL2.10.2 Identify components of a digital footprint (e.g., active and passive data) and the lasting impact
CSL3.10.2 Explore the inverse relationship between online privacy and personal security (e.g., convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information)
CSL3.10.3 Describe the beneficial and intrusive aspects of advancing and emerging technologies (e.g., Artificially Intelligent Agents, IoT, Robotics, self-aware, Skynet)
CSL4.10.3 Identify the ethical and moral implications encountered in managing and curating knowledge (e.g., harvesting, information overload, knowledge management reposting, sharing, summarizing)