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Arkansas 6-8 Standards Mapping

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Computing Ideas (Lovelace)

94 Standards in this Framework 50 Standards Mapped 53% Mapped to Course


Standard Lessons
CT.1.6.1 Select basic steps to solve algorithmic problems. Problems within these standards can be, but are not limited to, real world problems or problems encountered in the student’s daily-life. The use of the word algorithm within these standards is applicable to all content areas, not just mathematics. Algorithm within these standards implies a sequence of steps followed when completing a particular task. The steps followed to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich is an algorithm. Problem solving steps may include, but are not limited to, identifying, stating, and exploring the problem; decomposing a problem into sub problems; examination of sample instances; and solution design, implementation, and testing.
  1. 1.1 Introduction to Programming With Karel
  2. 1.9 For Loops
  3. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  4. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  5. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  6. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  7. 14.1 Intro to Python with Tracy the Turtle
  8. 14.2 Tracy's Grid World
  9. 14.3 Turning Tracy
  10. 14.4 For Loops
  11. 14.5 Turning Tracy Using Angles
  12. 14.8 Functions
  13. 14.9 Artistic Effects
  14. 14.10 Top Down Design
  15. 14.11 Variables
  16. 14.12 User Input
  17. 14.13 Parameters
  18. 14.14 Using i in For Loops
  19. 14.15 Extended Loop Control
  20. 14.16 If Statements
  21. 14.17 If/ Else Statements
  22. 14.18 While Loops
  23. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
CT.1.7.1 Evaluate basic steps of algorithmic problem solving to design solutions. Problems within these standards can be, but are not limited to, real world problems or problems encountered in the student’s daily-life. The use of the word algorithm within these standards is applicable to all content areas, not just mathematics. Algorithm within these standards implies a sequence of steps followed when completing a particular task. The steps followed to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich is an algorithm. Problem solving steps may include, but are not limited to, identifying, stating, and exploring the problem; decomposing a problem into sub problems; examination of sample instances; and solution design, implementation, and testing.
  1. 1.1 Introduction to Programming With Karel
  2. 1.9 For Loops
  3. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  4. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  5. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  6. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  7. 14.4 For Loops
  8. 14.9 Artistic Effects
  9. 14.10 Top Down Design
  10. 14.11 Variables
  11. 14.13 Parameters
  12. 14.15 Extended Loop Control
  13. 14.17 If/ Else Statements
  14. 14.18 While Loops
  15. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
CT.1.8.1 Solve algorithmic problems of increasing complexity. Problems within these standards can be, but are not limited to, real world problems or problems encountered in the student’s daily-life. The use of the word algorithm within these standards is applicable to all content areas, not just mathematics. Algorithm within these standards implies a sequence of steps followed when completing a particular task. The steps followed to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich is an algorithm. Problem solving steps may include, but are not limited to, identifying, stating, and exploring the problem; decomposing a problem into sub problems; examination of sample instances; and solution design, implementation, and testing.
  1. 1.1 Introduction to Programming With Karel
  2. 1.9 For Loops
  3. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  4. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  5. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  6. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  7. 14.4 For Loops
  8. 14.9 Artistic Effects
  9. 14.10 Top Down Design
  10. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
CT.1.7.2 Compare and contrast examples of high level and low level programming languages. This intent of this standard is for the student to be provided an introduction to differences between high and low level computer programming languages. The student is not required to write a computer program in high-level and low-level programming languages to meet this standard. Low-level language typically refers to machine code or assembly language, which computers can use without translation. Programs written using high-level languages, such as Java and C++, are closer to human language and must be translated to machine code before a computer can use them
CT.1.8.2 Investigate the notion of hierarchy in computing including high level languages, translations, instruction sets, and logic circuits. This intent of this standard is for the student to be provided an introduction to differences between high and low level computer programming languages. The student is not required to write a computer program in high-level and low-level programming languages to meet this standard. Low-level language typically refers to machine code or assembly language, which computers can use without translation. Programs written using high-level languages, such as Java and C++, are closer to human language and must be translated to machine code before a computer can use them
CT.2.6.2 Discuss binary numbers, logic, sets, and functions and their application to computer science
  1. 6.2 Number Systems
  2. 6.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  3. 6.4 Pixel Images
  4. 6.5 Hexadecimal
  5. 14.8 Functions
CT.2.7.2 Examine binary numbers, logic, sets, and functions and their application to computer science
  1. 6.2 Number Systems
  2. 6.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  3. 6.4 Pixel Images
  4. 6.5 Hexadecimal
  5. 14.8 Functions
CT.2.8.2 Evaluate the relationship between binary and hexadecimal representations
  1. 6.2 Number Systems
  2. 6.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  3. 6.4 Pixel Images
  4. 6.5 Hexadecimal
CT.2.6.3 Describe events as subsets of a sample set identifying unions, intersections, and complements (e.g., describing information sorted with a Venn diagram)
CT.2.7.3 Create compound statements that represent unions, intersections, and complements using OR, AND, and NOT (e.g., writing statements from information sorted with a Venn diagram)
CT.2.8.3 Create events as subsets of a sample set using logic (e.g., OR, AND, NOT, NOR, XOR)
CT.2.6.4 Select variables that appropriately represent data
  1. 14.11 Variables
CT.2.7.4 Construct expressions and equations
CT.2.8.4 Create a function, method, or similar construct with given parameters to be used within a computer program. Any computing device including but not limited to a computer, tablet, or graphing calculator, may be used to meet this standard.
  1. 1.9 For Loops
  2. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  3. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  4. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  5. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  6. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  7. 14.13 Parameters
CT.3.6.1 Analyze appropriate collaborative behaviors (e.g., providing useful feedback, integrating feedback, understanding and accepting multiple perspectives, using socialization) to solve problems. The purpose of this standard is to develop problem solving abilities through collaboration skills, which are necessary within computer science and many other technical fields. The standard does not require the use of a computer program. The educator will determine the preferred student grouping (e.g., whole group, small group, pairs). The problems students are expected to solve may be related to real-life, age appropriate situations they encounter daily.
CT.3.7.1 Demonstrate appropriate collaborative behaviors (e.g., providing useful feedback, integrating feedback, understanding and accepting multiple perspectives, using socialization) to solve problems. The purpose of this standard is to develop problem solving abilities through collaboration skills, which are necessary within computer science and many other technical fields. The standard does not require the use of a computer program. The educator will determine the preferred student grouping (e.g., whole group, small group, pairs). The problems students are expected to solve may be related to real-life, age appropriate situations they encounter daily.
CT.3.8.1 Demonstrate appropriate collaborative behaviors (e.g., providing useful feedback, integrating feedback, understanding and accepting multiple perspectives, using socialization) to solve problems of increasing complexity. The purpose of this standard is to develop problem solving abilities through collaboration skills, which are necessary within computer science and many other technical fields. The standard does not require the use of a computer program. The educator will determine the preferred student grouping (e.g., whole group, small group, pairs). The problems students are expected to solve may be related to real-life, age appropriate situations they encounter daily.
D.4.6.1 Represent a variety of data in multiple formats. Data within these standards may be simple measuring points (e.g., text, sounds, pictures, numbers). These activities may be completed with guidance or within groups.
D.4.7.1 Evaluate the effectiveness of visual representations of data. Data within these standards may be simple measuring points (e.g., text, sounds, pictures, numbers). These activities may be completed with guidance or within groups.
D.4.8.1 Create and analyze data representations of various artifacts. Data within these standards may be simple measuring points (e.g., text, sounds, pictures, numbers). These activities may be completed with guidance or within groups.
D.4.6.2 Discuss how and why binary is used to represent data in a computer. These standards do not require students to understand the machine level language of computers. For example, at Grade 7, a computer does not understand the concept of an upper versus lower-case letter ‘F’. A computer distinguishes between the two only because they each have a different ASCII numeral value of 7010 and 10210, respectively
  1. 6.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  2. 6.4 Pixel Images
  3. 6.5 Hexadecimal
  4. 6.6 Pixel Colors!
  5. 6.7 Image Manipulation
D.4.7.2 Discuss how American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) codes represent data in a computer. These standards do not require students to understand the machine level language of computers. For example, at Grade 7, a computer does not understand the concept of an upper versus lower-case letter ‘F’. A computer distinguishes between the two only because they each have a different ASCII numeral value of 7010 and 10210, respectively
  1. 6.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  2. 6.4 Pixel Images
  3. 6.5 Hexadecimal
  4. 6.6 Pixel Colors!
  5. 6.7 Image Manipulation
D.4.8.2 Discuss how and why hexadecimal codes are used to represent data in a computer. These standards do not require students to understand the machine level language of computers. For example, at Grade 7, a computer does not understand the concept of an upper versus lower-case letter ‘F’. A computer distinguishes between the two only because they each have a different ASCII numeral value of 7010 and 10210, respectively
  1. 6.3 Encoding Text with Binary
  2. 6.4 Pixel Images
  3. 6.5 Hexadecimal
  4. 6.6 Pixel Colors!
  5. 6.7 Image Manipulation
D.5.6.1 Collect data using a variety of tools (e.g., analog, digital)
D.5.7.1 Collect data from multiple sources using a variety of tools (e.g., analog, digital)
D.5.8.1 Critique data collected from multiple sources using a variety of tools (e.g., analog, digital)
D.5.6.2 Describe the characteristics (e.g., collection environment, units of measure, input method) of the collected data
D.5.7.2 Analyze the quality of collected data, based on its characteristics (e.g., temperatures gathered at different scale) to determine the value provided to the user
D.5.8.2 Collect data to be used for quality analysis
D.5.6.3 Evaluate the most effective ways to collect, arrange, and visually represent data
D.5.7.3 Evaluate the most effective ways to collect, arrange, and visually represent data
D.5.8.3 Evaluate the most effective ways to collect, arrange, and visually represent data
D.6.6.1 Compare various problems that can be solved using modeling and simulation
D.6.7.1 Evaluate the effectiveness of a model/simulation with a peer
D.6.8.1 Analyze the degree to which a computer model accurately represents an actual situation
D.6.7.2 Examine techniques for creating models and simulations to be used for data analysis
D.6.8.2 Create a model and/or simulation to be used for data analysis
A.7.6.1 Create algorithms to solve problems and evaluate their effectiveness
  1. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  2. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  3. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  4. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  5. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  6. 14.4 For Loops
  7. 14.13 Parameters
  8. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.7.1 Create algorithms to solve problems and evaluate their effectiveness using constraints (e.g., solution time, maximum number of steps)
  1. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  2. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  3. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  4. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  5. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  6. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.8.1 Create algorithms to solve problems of increasing complexity and evaluate their effectiveness using constraints (e.g., solution time, maximum number of steps)
  1. 1.11 If/Else Statements
  2. 1.12 While Loops in Karel
  3. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  4. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  5. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  6. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.6.2 Compare and contrast algorithms of appropriate complexity
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.4 For Loops
  5. 14.13 Parameters
  6. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.7.2 Compare and contrast algorithms of appropriate complexity
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.4 For Loops
  5. 14.13 Parameters
  6. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.8.2 Compare and contrast algorithms of appropriate complexity
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.4 For Loops
  5. 14.13 Parameters
  6. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.6.3 Identify and correct errors within multiple algorithms
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.10 Top Down Design
  5. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.7.3 Identify and correct multiple errors within a program
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.10 Top Down Design
  5. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.8.3 Identify and correct multiple errors within multiple programs
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.7.6.4 Design and test algorithms of appropriate complexity collaboratively
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
A.7.7.4 Design and test algorithms of appropriate complexity collaboratively
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
A.7.8.4 Design and test algorithms of appropriate complexity collaboratively using technology
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
A.8.6.1 Use a visual block-based and/or textbased programming language individually and collaboratively to solve problems of increasing complexity
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.1 Intro to Python with Tracy the Turtle
  5. 14.2 Tracy's Grid World
  6. 14.3 Turning Tracy
  7. 14.4 For Loops
  8. 14.5 Turning Tracy Using Angles
  9. 14.8 Functions
  10. 14.9 Artistic Effects
  11. 14.10 Top Down Design
  12. 14.11 Variables
  13. 14.12 User Input
  14. 14.13 Parameters
  15. 14.14 Using i in For Loops
  16. 14.15 Extended Loop Control
  17. 14.16 If Statements
  18. 14.17 If/ Else Statements
  19. 14.18 While Loops
  20. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.8.7.1 Use a visual block-based and/or textbased programming language individually and collaboratively to solve problems of increasing complexity
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.1 Intro to Python with Tracy the Turtle
  5. 14.2 Tracy's Grid World
  6. 14.3 Turning Tracy
  7. 14.4 For Loops
  8. 14.5 Turning Tracy Using Angles
  9. 14.8 Functions
  10. 14.9 Artistic Effects
  11. 14.10 Top Down Design
  12. 14.11 Variables
  13. 14.12 User Input
  14. 14.13 Parameters
  15. 14.14 Using i in For Loops
  16. 14.15 Extended Loop Control
  17. 14.16 If Statements
  18. 14.17 If/ Else Statements
  19. 14.18 While Loops
  20. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
A.8.8.1 Create a program individually and collaboratively using a text-based programming language
  1. 1.13 Control Structures Example
  2. 1.14 More Karel Examples and Testing
  3. 1.16 Karel Challenges
  4. 14.4 For Loops
  5. 14.8 Functions
  6. 14.9 Artistic Effects
  7. 14.10 Top Down Design
  8. 14.13 Parameters
  9. 14.15 Extended Loop Control
  10. 14.17 If/ Else Statements
  11. 14.18 While Loops
  12. 14.19 Putting Together Control Structures
CC.9.6.1 Investigate a career that requires computing and technology
CC.9.7.1 Describe how computer science enhances other career fields
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
  2. 8.1 Project: The Effects of the Internet
CC.9.8.1 Predict the role of computer science in future careers
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
  2. 8.1 Project: The Effects of the Internet
CC.9.6.2 Identify what distinguishes humans from machines focusing on human intelligence versus machine intelligence (e.g., robot motion, speech and language understanding, and computer vision)
CC.9.7.2 Describe ways in which computers use models of intelligent behavior (e.g., robot motion, speech and language understanding, and computer vision)
CC.9.8.2 Compare and contrast human intelligence and computer intelligence (e.g., emotional decision making versus logical decisions, common sense, literal versus abstract)
CC.10.6.1 Demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency with keyboards and other input/output devices. (e.g., printer, student response systems, texting/instant messaging, voice assist)
  1. 2.4 Hardware
CC.10.7.1 Demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency with keyboards and other input/output devices. (e.g., printer, student response systems, texting/instant messaging, voice assist)
  1. 2.4 Hardware
CC.10.8.1 Demonstrate an appropriate level of proficiency with keyboards and other input/output devices. (e.g., printer, student response systems, texting/instant messaging, voice assist)
  1. 2.4 Hardware
CC.10.6.2 Recognize the expense of the equipment, how care and protection of the computers can prolong use and save the cost of purchasing new equipment, therefore benefiting all students
CC.10.7.2 Recognize the expense of the equipment, how care and protection of the computers can prolong use and save the cost of purchasing new equipment, therefore benefiting all students
CC.10.8.2 Recognize the expense of the equipment, how care and protection of the computers can prolong use and save the cost of purchasing new equipment, therefore benefiting all students
CC.10.6.3 Demonstrate touch typing techniques while increasing speed and maintaining accuracy
CC.10.7.3 Demonstrate touch typing techniques while increasing speed and maintaining accuracy
CC.10.8.3 Demonstrate touch typing techniques while increasing speed and maintaining accuracy
CC.10.6.4 Practice proper keyboarding technique ● posture ● elbows down ● body centered in front of keyboard
CC.10.7.4 Practice proper keyboarding technique ● posture ● elbows down ● body centered in front of keyboard
CC.10.8.4 Practice proper keyboarding technique ● posture ● elbows down ● body centered in front of keyboard
CC.11.6.1 Apply productivity/multimedia tools to support communication throughout the curriculum
CC.11.7.1 Apply productivity/multimedia tools to support communication throughout the curriculum
CC.11.8.1 Design, develop, and publish/present products (e.g., videos, podcasts, websites) using technology resources that demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts
  1. 10.1 Project: Public Service Announcement
CC.11.6.2 Describe how information can be transmitted by many computing devices via a network
  1. 4.13 Viewing Websites
  2. 7.5 Routing
  3. 7.6 Packets and Protocols
CC.11.7.2 Identify major components and functions of computer systems and networks
  1. 4.13 Viewing Websites
  2. 7.5 Routing
  3. 7.6 Packets and Protocols
CC.11.8.2 Describe major components and functions of computer systems and networks
  1. 4.13 Viewing Websites
  2. 7.5 Routing
  3. 7.6 Packets and Protocols
CC.11.6.4 Apply strategies for solving simple hardware and software problems that may occur during use
CC.11.7.4 Apply strategies for identifying and solving routine hardware and software problems that occur during everyday computer use
CC.11.8.4 Apply strategies for identifying and solving routine hardware and software problems that occur in everyday computer use
CGE.12.6.1 Demonstrate an understanding of positive and negative impact of technology (e.g., mobile computing and communication, web technologies, digital security, virtualization) on the daily life of individuals and society
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
CGE.12.7.1 Analyze changes in technology over time and the effects those changes have on the daily life of individuals and society
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
CGE.12.8.1 Analyze positive and negative impacts (e.g., workforce, economy, education, culture, environment) of technology on the world
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
CGE.12.6.2 Discuss the difference between appropriate, legal, and ethical uses of technology
  1. 9.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
CGE.12.7.2 Demonstrate an understanding between appropriate, legal, and ethical uses of technology
  1. 9.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
CGE.12.8.2 Analyze the difference between appropriate, legal, and ethical uses of technology
  1. 9.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
CGE.12.6.3 Demonstrate an understanding of the credibility, bias, accuracy, relevance, age appropriateness, and comprehensiveness of electronic information sources
  1. 9.5 Information Literacy
CGE.12.7.3 Evaluate and discuss the credibility, bias, accuracy, relevance, age appropriateness, comprehensiveness, of electronic information sources concerning real-world problems
  1. 9.5 Information Literacy
CGE.12.8.3 Apply strategies for determining the reliability of information found on the Internet
  1. 9.5 Information Literacy
CGE.12.6.4 Demonstrate ethical uses in copyright, fair use, and intellectual property in various media (e.g., music, graphics, video, etc.)
  1. 9.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
CGE.12.7.4 Demonstrate ethical uses in copyright, fair use and intellectual property in various media (e.g., music, graphics, video, etc.)
  1. 9.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
CGE.12.8.4 Analyze ethical issues that relate to copyright, fair use and intellectual property in various media (e.g., music, graphics, video, etc.)
  1. 9.6 Creative Credit & Copyright
CGE.12.6.5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of access to computing resources
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
  2. 8.1 Project: The Effects of the Internet
CGE.12.7.5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of access to computing resources on a global economy
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
  2. 8.1 Project: The Effects of the Internet
CGE.12.8.5 Analyze the impact of the availability to computing resources on accessing critical information
  1. 7.7 The Impact of the Internet
  2. 8.1 Project: The Effects of the Internet